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Creator Attributed to Edward Young, 1683–1765, British

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William Blake Plate 21 (page 37): 'Love, and love only, is the loan for love'
William Blake, 1757–1827, British
Plate 21 (page 37): 'Love, and love only, is the loan for love'
1797
William Blake Plate 23 (page 41): 'One radiant MARK; the Death bed of the Just'
William Blake, 1757–1827, British
Plate 23 (page 41): 'One radiant MARK; the Death bed of the Just'
1797
William Blake Plate 26 (page 49): 'As if the sun could envy, check'd his beam'
William Blake, 1757–1827, British
Plate 26 (page 49): 'As if the sun could envy, check'd his beam'
1797
William Blake Plate 36 (page 80): 'The thunder if in that the ALMIGHTY dwells'
William Blake, 1757–1827, British
Plate 36 (page 80): 'The thunder if in that the ALMIGHTY dwells'
1797
William Blake Plate 41 (page 92): 'When faith is virtue, reason makes it so'
William Blake, 1757–1827, British
Plate 41 (page 92): 'When faith is virtue, reason makes it so'
1797
William Blake Plate 33 (page 72): 'And vapid; sense and reason shew the door'
William Blake, 1757–1827, British
Plate 33 (page 72): 'And vapid; sense and reason shew the door'
1797
William Blake Plate 17 (page 27): 'O treacherous conscience! while she seems to sleep"
William Blake, 1757–1827, British
Plate 17 (page 27): 'O treacherous conscience! while she seems to sleep"
1797
William Blake Plate 31 (page 65): [Night the Fourth] 'THE/ CHRISTIAN/ TRIUMPH'
William Blake, 1757–1827, British
Plate 31 (page 65): [Night the Fourth] 'THE/ CHRISTIAN/ TRIUMPH'
1797
William Blake The Complaint and the Consolation; or Night Thoughts (and title page)
William Blake, 1757–1827, British
The Complaint and the Consolation; or Night Thoughts (and title page)
1797
William Blake Plate 4 (page 7): 'Till at Death's toll, whose restless iron tounge'
William Blake, 1757–1827, British
Plate 4 (page 7): 'Till at Death's toll, whose restless iron tounge'
1797
William Blake Plate 6 (page 10): 'Disease invades the chastest temperence'
William Blake, 1757–1827, British
Plate 6 (page 10): 'Disease invades the chastest temperence'
1797
William Blake Plate 11 (page 17): 'NIGHT the SECOND/ ON/ TIME,/DEATH/ AND FRIENDSHIP'
William Blake, 1757–1827, British
Plate 11 (page 17): 'NIGHT the SECOND/ ON/ TIME,/DEATH/ AND FRIENDSHIP'
1797
William Blake Plate 12 (page 19): 'Emblem of that which shall awake the dead'
William Blake, 1757–1827, British
Plate 12 (page 19): 'Emblem of that which shall awake the dead'
1797
William Blake Plate 9 (page 15):' The longest night though longer far, would fail'
Engravings by William Blake, 1757–1827, British
Plate 9 (page 15):' The longest night though longer far, would fail'
1797
William Blake Plate 13 (page 23): 'We censure nature for a span too short'
Engravings by William Blake, 1757–1827, British
Plate 13 (page 23): 'We censure nature for a span too short'
1797
William Blake Plate 7 (page 12): 'Its favours here are trials, not rewards'
William Blake, 1757–1827, British
Plate 7 (page 12): 'Its favours here are trials, not rewards'
1797
William Blake Plate 2 (page 1): 'Swift on his downy pinion flies from woe'
William Blake, 1757–1827, British
Plate 2 (page 1): 'Swift on his downy pinion flies from woe'
1797
William Blake Plate 3 (page 4): 'What, though my soul fantastick measures trod'
William Blake, 1757–1827, British
Plate 3 (page 4): 'What, though my soul fantastick measures trod'
1797
William Blake Plate 8 (page 13): 'The present moment terminates our sight'
William Blake, 1757–1827, British
Plate 8 (page 13): 'The present moment terminates our sight'
1797
William Blake Plate 27 (page 54): 'The vale of death! that hush'd cimmerian vale'
William Blake, 1757–1827, British
Plate 27 (page 54): 'The vale of death! that hush'd cimmerian vale'
1797
William Blake Plate 30 (page 63): 'This KING OF TERRORS is the PRINCE OF PEACE'
William Blake, 1757–1827, British
Plate 30 (page 63): 'This KING OF TERRORS is the PRINCE OF PEACE'
1797
William Blake Plate 37 (page 86): 'His hand the good man fastens on the skies'
William Blake, 1757–1827, British
Plate 37 (page 86): 'His hand the good man fastens on the skies'
1797
William Blake Plate 40 (page 90): 'That touch, with charm celestial heals the soul'
William Blake, 1757–1827, British
Plate 40 (page 90): 'That touch, with charm celestial heals the soul'
1797
William Blake Plate 15 (page 25): 'Behold him, when past by; what then is seen'
William Blake, 1757–1827, British
Plate 15 (page 25): 'Behold him, when past by; what then is seen'
1797
William Blake Plate 20 (page 35): 'Teaching, we learn; and giving, we retain'
William Blake, 1757–1827, British
Plate 20 (page 35): 'Teaching, we learn; and giving, we retain'
1797
William Blake Plate 22 (page 40): ' Angels should paint it, angels ever there'
William Blake, 1757–1827, British
Plate 22 (page 40): ' Angels should paint it, angels ever there'
1797
William Blake Plate 25 (page 46): 'Where sense runs savage broke from reason's chain'
William Blake, 1757–1827, British
Plate 25 (page 46): 'Where sense runs savage broke from reason's chain'
1797
William Blake Plate 34 (page 73): 'Draw the dire steel? -- ah no!-- the dreadful blessing'
William Blake, 1757–1827, British
Plate 34 (page 73): 'Draw the dire steel? -- ah no!-- the dreadful blessing'
1797
William Blake Plate 35 (page 75): 'The Sun beheld it -- No, the shocking Scene Drove back his chariot'
William Blake, 1757–1827, British
Plate 35 (page 75): 'The Sun beheld it -- No, the shocking Scene Drove back his chariot'
1797
William Blake Plate 38 (page 87): 'Is lost in love! thou great PHILANTHROPIST'
William Blake, 1757–1827, British
Plate 38 (page 87): 'Is lost in love! thou great PHILANTHROPIST'
1797
William Blake Plate 19 (page 33): 'Like that, the dial speaks; and points to thee'
William Blake, 1757–1827, British
Plate 19 (page 33): 'Like that, the dial speaks; and points to thee'
1797
William Blake Plate 32 (page 70): 'Till death, that mighty hunter, earths them all'
William Blake, 1757–1827, British
Plate 32 (page 70): 'Till death, that mighty hunter, earths them all'
1797
William Blake Plate 18 (page 31): ''Tis greatly wise to talk with our past hours'
William Blake, 1757–1827, British
Plate 18 (page 31): ''Tis greatly wise to talk with our past hours'
1797
William Blake Plate 24 (page 43): 'NIGHT/ THE/ THIRD,/ NARCISSA'
William Blake, 1757–1827, British
Plate 24 (page 43): 'NIGHT/ THE/ THIRD,/ NARCISSA'
1797
William Blake Plate 28 (page 55): 'Ungrateful, shall we grieve their hovering shades'
William Blake, 1757–1827, British
Plate 28 (page 55): 'Ungrateful, shall we grieve their hovering shades'
1797
William Blake Plate 29 (page 57): 'Trembling each gulp, lest death should snatch the bowl'
William Blake, 1757–1827, British
Plate 29 (page 57): 'Trembling each gulp, lest death should snatch the bowl'
1797
William Blake Plate 42 (page 93): 'If angels tremble, 'tis at such a sight'
William Blake, 1757–1827, British
Plate 42 (page 93): 'If angels tremble, 'tis at such a sight'
1797
William Blake Plate 43 (page 95): 'The goddess bursts in thunder and in flame'
William Blake, 1757–1827, British
Plate 43 (page 95): 'The goddess bursts in thunder and in flame'
1797
William Blake The Complaint and the Consolation; or Night Thoughts
William Blake, 1757–1827, British
The Complaint and the Consolation; or Night Thoughts
1797