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Creator:
Berners, Juliana, 1388?- author.
Title(s):

Here in thys boke afore ar contenyt the bokys of haukyng and huntyng with other plesuris dyuerse as in the boke apperis and also of cootarmuris a nobull werke. ...

Additional Title(s):

Boke of Saint Albans

Here in thys boke afore ar contenyt the bokys of haukyng and huntyng with other plesuris dyverse as in the boke apperis and also of cootarmuris a nobull werke

Here in thys booke folowyng is determyned the lynage of coote armuris

Book of Saint Albans

In so moch that gentill men and honest persones haue grete delite in haukyng and desire to haue the maner to take haukys

In so moch that gentill men and honest persones have grete delite in haukyng and desire to have the maner to take haukys

Boke of Saint Albans

Published/Created:
[Saint Albans] : [Schoolmaster Printer], [1486]
Physical Description:
[180] p. : ill. ; 29 cm. (fol.)
Holdings:
Rare Books and Manuscripts
CR1614 .B47 1486+ Copy 1 Oversize
Yale Center for British Art, Paul Mellon Collection
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Rare Books and Manuscripts
CR1614 .B47 1486+ Copy 2 Oversize
Yale Center for British Art, Paul Mellon Collection
View by request in the Study Room [Request]
Note: The Study Room is open by appointment. Please visit the Study Room page on our website for more details.

Copyright Status:
Copyright Undetermined
Classification:
Books
Notes:
BEIN Zi +9828: Fol. 12 (2d count, blank) wanting; fol. 45 mutilated and restored. For fuller description see collation-leaf in volume.
Comprising four treatises--on hawking, hunting (in verse), the rules for forming coats of arms, and "the blasyng of arms" (the last an explication of existing heraldic devices).
Title from colophon, ²f9v, which continues: And here now endyth the boke of blasyng of armys translatyt and complylyt togedyr at Seynt albons the yere from thincarnacion of owre lorde Ih[es]u Crist. M.CCCC.lxxx vi.
Known as the Book of St. Albans.
Attributed to Juliana Berners, whose name appears in the colophon on leaf ¹f4r. It is likely that Berners was not responsible for the entire work; she probably contributed only a few observation to the sections on hunting and hawking.
The first British work to contain illustrations printed in more than one color; the first book on hunting to be printed in England; and the first known book attributed to an English woman. Also thought to be the earliest printed description in English of the properties of a good horse. Most of the information on hunting is culled from William Twiti's 14th-century treatise on venery.
Printed in red and black in two fonts of Gothic type; 117 woodcut armorials, for the most part printed in red, blue, black, and yellow; initials and paragraph marks printed in red or blue; the printer's mark (white on red) on recto of last leaf.
Signatures: a-c⁸ d⁴ e-f⁸; ²a-b⁶ ²c-e⁸ ²f¹⁰.
The first leaf is blank.
Text commences on a2r: In so moch that gentill men and honest persones haue grete delite in haukyng and desire to haue the maner to take haukys .
"Here in thys booke folowyng is determyned the lynage of coote armuris" begins new register.
Selected exhibitions: "Paul Mellon's Legacy: A Passion for British Art" (Yale Center for British Art, 18 April-29 July, 2007); "'The Compleat Horseman': Sporting Books from the Bequest of Paul Mellon" (Yale Center for British Art, 17 February-29 April, 2001); "Color Printing in England, 1486-1870" (Yale Center for British Art, 20 April-25 June, 1978); "Fifty-five Books Printed before 1525: Representing the Works of England's First Printers, an Exhibition from the Collection of Paul Mellon" (Grolier Club, 17 January-3 March 1968).
Gesamtkatalog der Wiegendrucke, 4932
Catalogue of books printed in the XVth century now in the British Museum, v. XI, page 304
Goff, F.R. Incunabula in American libraries, B-1030
Incunabula short title catalogue, ib01030000
Copinger, W.A. Supplement to Hain's Repertorium bibliographicum, 2465
Proctor, R. Index to the early printed books in the British Museum, 9828
English short title catalogue, S106521
Wing, D.G. Short-title catalogue of books printed in England, Scotland, Ireland, Wales, and British America, and of English books printed in other countries, 1641-1700 (2nd ed. 1994), 3308
Grolier Club. Fifty-five books printed before 1525, 54
Podeschi, J.B. Books on the horse and horsemanship, 4
Friedman, J. Color printing in England, 1486-1870, 1
Hardie, M. English coloured books, p. 4-5
Paul Mellon's legacy, p. 302
BAC: British Art Center copy 1 imperfect: lacks leaves 83, 88, and 90, which are supplied in pen-facsimile. Leaf 89 is partially supplied from another copy, the fragment inlaid and the missing text extended in pen-facsimile. Pen-facsimile may be by John Harris; "F.S. by J.S." is noted in graphite on the recto of the final leaf. For more information on the facsimiles of John Harris, see: the British Library (http://www.bl.uk/treasures/caxton/johnharris.html); and Great Exhibition, 1851, Reports by the juries on the subjects in the thirty classes into which the exhibition was divided, p. 405 (http://hdl.handle.net/2027/mdp.39015006967783?urlappend=%3Bseq=535).
BAC: British Art Center copy 1 bound in 19th-century brown morocco, with gilt edges; binding by Clarke and Bedford. Bookplates: Littlecote, John Pierpont Morgan, Richard Bennett. The recto of the initial blank has manuscript notes in pen in two contemporary hands.
BAC: British Art Center copy 2 is a single, fragmented leaf, mounted on card. Heavily wormed and possible evidence of being used as binding waste. From the Leaf Collection (no. 451).
Subject Terms:
Bennett, Richard -- Bookplate.
Falconry -- Early works to 1800.
Heraldry -- Early works to 1800.
Hunting -- Early works to 1800.
Incunabula in Yale Library.
Littlecote -- Bookplate.
Morgan, J. Pierpont (John Pierpont), 1837-1913 -- Bookplate.
Woodcut, Colored -- Specimens -- 1486.
Form/Genre:
Incunabula.
Printing in multiple colors (Printing) -- Great Britain -- 15th century.
Color printing -- Great Britain -- 15th century.
Contributors:
Schoolmaster Printer, active 1479-1486, printer.
Harris, John, 1791?-1873, facsimilist.
Clarke & Bedford, binder.
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"Printing came to England in 1476, twenty years after its invention in Germany, when William Caxton set up his press in Westminster. Other presses were not long in appearing, in London and Oxford, and, by 1485, in the Hertfordshire town of St. Albans. Little is known of the St. Albans press. Wynkyn de Worde, Caxton's successor who printed a second edition of this book in 1496, stated in the colophon that the text was "compiled in a book and imprinted by our sometime Schoolmaster of St. Alban," thus providing historians with a name for, if little information about, the Schoolmaster Printer. He is known for only two books, the Chronicilis of Englonde of 1485, and, exhibited here, the Book of hawking, hunting, and heraldry. The latter was the first attempt in England to provide printed color illustrations, barely five years after the first English printed illustrations of any sort had appeared in Caxton's Mirrour of the world. The Book of hawking, hunting, and heraldry is, in fact, four separate treatises on hawking, hunting, the rules of forming coats of arms, and, illustrated here, "the blasyng of armys," that is, explication of existing devices. The work on hunting has a colophon attributing authorship to one Dame Juliana Berners (b.1388?), since identified as a prioress of Sopwell Nunnery in Hertfordshire, and sometimes the entire book has been credited as her work. It is not clear just how the colored coats of arms, appearing in as many as three colors on a page, were printed. One possibility is that letterpress and woodcuts were printed in a single pull of the press, as Fust and Schoeffer's Mainz Psalter of 1457 is believed to have been executed. In such an arrangement the wood blocks are removed from the bed of type to be inked individually, while the type is inked in black; they are replaced in the "forme" of type for printing together. Another technique that might have been employed here is printing the letterpress first in black, with the wood blocks afterwards impressed in the spaces left for them, possibly by hand in the manner of a stamp. In any event, the St. Albans book remained an isolated example of color printing in England. Apart from the occasional use of red ink on type (but never on illustrations) for initial letters or title-page emphasis, English printing remained monochromatic for another 250 years."--Joan M. Friedman, Color Printing in England, 1486-1870.

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