<< YCBA Home Yale Center for British Art Yale Center for British Art << YCBA Home

YCBA Collections Search

 
Creator:
Edward Dayes, 1763–1804, British
Title:

Haweswater, Westmoreland

Date:
ca. 1795
Medium:
Watercolor and graphite on moderately thick, slightly textured, cream wove paper
Dimensions:
Sheet: 11 13/16 x 17 5/8 inches (30 x 44.7 cm)
Inscription(s)/Marks/Lettering:

Scratched signature, lower right: "Dayes"; not dated

Credit Line:
Yale Center for British Art, Paul Mellon Collection
Copyright Status:
Public Domain
Accession Number:
B1981.25.2577
Classification:
Drawings & Watercolors
Collection:
Prints and Drawings
Subject Terms:
boy | child | fields | fish | fisherman | fishing pole | genre subject | gesture | landscape | man | merchant | mountains | peasants | reservoir | rocks (landforms) | sailboat | trees | valley | woman
Associated Places:
Cumbria | England | Haweswater Reservoir | United Kingdom | Westmorland
Access:
Accessible by request in the Study Room [Request]
Note: The Study Room is open to Yale ID holders by appointment. Please visit the Study Room page on our website for more details.
Link:
https://collections.britishart.yale.edu/catalog/tms:7724
Export:
XML

It is not known Edward Dayes toured the Lakes. He exhibited "A View on Keswick Lake, Cumberland" at the RA in 1791 and another view of Keswick in 1802, suggesting a visit to the region in the years just prior to the earlier date, and perhaps a second visit in the later 1790s or early 1800s. While all these artists' tours must be seen in the context of picturesque touring, changing popular conceptions of the Picturesque caused some artists, including Dayes, to object to the whole notion. In his Essays on Painting, published shortly after his death, Dayes maintained that the Picturesque should not apply to "objects 'rough and irregular,' or such as a deformed, aged, and ugly," and he railed against the taste for pictures "peopled with gypsies and vagabonds, dirty beggars, clothed with rags." In his view of Haweswater, the fisherman and the milkmaid in the foreground are fastidious in dress and elegant in manner.

If you have information about this object that may be of assistance please contact us.