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Creator:
Keith Vaughan, 1912–1977, British
Title:

Harrow Hill after Snow

Date:
1968
Medium:
Oil on canvas
Dimensions:
Support (PTG): 40 x 36 inches (101.6 x 91.4 cm)
Inscription(s)/Marks/Lettering:

Dated, verso: "1968"

Credit Line:
Yale Center for British Art, Paul Mellon Fund
Copyright Status:
© Estate of the Artist
Accession Number:
B1998.17
Classification:
Paintings
Collection:
Paintings and Sculpture
Subject Terms:
abstract art | brown | brownish gray | brushstrokes | gray (color) | hill | landscape | snow | white (color)
Associated Places:
England | Essex | Europe | Toppesfield | United Kingdom
Access:
On view in the galleries
Link:
https://collections.britishart.yale.edu/catalog/tms:9927
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IIIF Manifest:
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Keith Vaughan served in the Pioneer Corps during the Second World War along with fellow artist John Minton. The pair shared a studio after the war when they were both influenced by the neoromantic movement. In the 1950s, Vaughan discovered the work of Nicholas de Stael and explored a fusion of figurative and abstract art, which in the 1960s evolved into a series of ambitious landscape paintings. Harrow Hill refers not to the area in northwest London but to Vaughan’s cottage in Toppesfield, in rural Essex. The level of abstraction in this painting is high; nonetheless, the vertical blocks across the canvas may refer to the windows, doors, and sloping roofs of local farm buildings, surrounded by patches of snow.

Gallery label for installation of YCBA collection, 2020



Like his friend John Minton (whose work is shown alongside), Keith Vaughan served in the Pioneer Corps during the Second World War, and the pair shared a studio after the war when they were both influenced by the neoromantic movement. In the 1950s he discovered the work of Nicholas de Stael and explored a fusion of figurative and abstract art, which in the 1960s evolved into a series of ambitious landscape paintings. Harrow Hill refers not to the area in northwest London but to Vaughan’s cottage in Toppesfield, in rural Essex. The level of abstraction in this painting is high; nonetheless, the vertical blocks across the canvas may refer to the windows and doors and sloping roofs of local farm buildings, surrounded by patches of snow.

Gallery label for installation of YCBA collection, 2016

Frederick Laws, Stokes and Vaughan, The Times (London), 13 January 1969, p. 13, Available online : Times Digital Archive Also available n microfilm : Film An T482 (SML)

Amy McDonald, Caro : Close Up, Yale Center for British Art Press Release , 2012, p. 2, Available online : YCBA website http://britishart.yale.edu/sites/default/files/Caro_Press-Release.pdf

Phillips sale catalogue : Modern British and Irish Paintings, Drawings, and Sculpture Tuesday 9th June 1998, Phillips Son & Neale, London, June 9, 1998, no. 00016, Auction Cat 1998 June


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