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Creator:
Attributed to Inigo Jones, 1573–1652, British
Title:

A Plumed Saddle-Horse

Date:
ca. 1640
Medium:
Pen and brown ink on medium, slightly textured, cream laid paper
Dimensions:
5 5/8 x 5 inches (14.3 x 12.7 cm)
Inscription(s)/Marks/Lettering:

Inscribed on back in graphite lower right: "No Ref."

Paul Mellon collector's mark

Credit Line:
Yale Center for British Art, Paul Mellon Collection
Copyright Status:
Public Domain
Accession Number:
B2001.2.977
Classification:
Drawings & Watercolors
Collection:
Prints and Drawings
Subject Terms:
animal art | feathers | horse (animal) | masques | plume | saddle
Associated Places:
Banqueting House | England | Europe | London | United Kingdom | Westminster
Associated People:
Jones, Inigo (1573–1652), architect and theatre designer
Access:
View by request in the Study Room [Request]
Note: The Study Room is open by appointment. Please visit the Study Room page on our website for more details.
Link:
https://collections.britishart.yale.edu/catalog/tms:47013
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This study of a plumed horse probably relates to Jones’s designs for the last masque ever performed at Whitehall Palace: Salmacida Spolia (The Spoils of Salamis) written by Sir William Davenant for performance in the year 1640. The visions of peace and plenty celebrated in the masque rang hollow when judged against actual events. The king’s eleven years of rule without Parliament had come to an end with the rebellion of the Scottish Covenanters which left King Charles I at war with his own subjects.

Matthew Hargraves, 2011
From 1622 masques were held each year in Jones's Banqueting House until the Rubens ceiling paintings were installed in 1635. It quickly became apparent that the smoke from the torches that illuminated the masques was damaging Rubens's paintings, and a wooden structure was erected nearby to accommodate the annual performances. This drawing of a plumed horse probably relates to Jones's designs for the last masque performed at Whitehall: Salmacida Spolia (The Spoils of Salamis) written by Sir William Davenant for the year 1640. The visions of peace and plenty celebrated in the masque rang hollow when measured against actual events. The king's eleven years of rule without Parliament were at an end, and the rebellion of the Scottish Covenanters left Charles at war with his own subjects.

Gallery label for Connections (Yale Center for British Art, 2011-05-26 - 2011-09-11)

Connections (Yale Center for British Art, 2011-05-26 - 2011-09-11) [YCBA Objects in the Exhibition]


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