<< YCBA Home Yale Center for British Art Yale Center for British Art << YCBA Home

YCBA Collections Search

 
Creator:
R. B. Kitaj, 1932–2007, American, active in Britain (1958–97)
Title:

School of London Diasporists

Date:
1988 to 2004
Medium:
Oil on canvas
Dimensions:
Support (PTG): 36 x 60 inches (91.4 x 152.4 cm)
Credit Line:
Yale Center for British Art, Gift of the artist
Copyright Status:
© Yale Center for British Art
Accession Number:
B2007.17
Classification:
Paintings
Collection:
Paintings and Sculpture
Subject Terms:
abstract art | brushstrokes | building | figures | portrait | transparent
Associated Places:
England | Europe | Greater London | London | United Kingdom
Access:
On view
Link:
https://collections.britishart.yale.edu/catalog/tms:55817
Export:
XML

This late painting by R. B. Kitaj began its life in 1988 as an elevation in blues of the modernist Cohen house by the architects Erich Mendelsohn (1887–1953) and Serge Chermayeff (1900–1996) in Old Church Street, Chelsea, just around the corner from where Kitaj was then living and working in London. In 2004, by now transplanted to Los Angeles, Kitaj completed the foreground. He writes: "It is a strange painting, done in stages over many years. It is a sort of frieze showing a few painters in my London circle in a free-form kind of style. . . . The initials stand for Kitaj, [Lucian] Freud, [Frank] Auerbach, my late wife Sandra Fisher, and [Leon] Kossoff." Notably, all of these painters were either not born in Britain or had parents who fled to London to escape persecution in their former homelands. The harsh execution and high-keyed colors belie an elegiac quality, and more than a hint of affection, in these brisk characterizations of some of the most important people in his life, partly visualized from, partly obscured by, the distant vantage point of Southern California.

Gallery label for installation of YCBA collection, 2020



This recent painting by Kitaj began its life in 1988 as an elevation in blues of the modernist Cohen house by the architects Erich Mendelsohn (1887–1953) and Serge Chermayeff (1900–1996) in Old Church Street, Chelsea, just around the corner from where Kitaj was then living and working in London. In 2004, by now transplanted to Los Angeles, Kitaj completed the foreground. He writes: “It is a strange painting, done in stages over many years. It is a sort of frieze showing a few painters in my London circle in a free-form kind of style…The initials stand for Kitaj, [Lucian] Freud, [Frank] Auerbach, my late wife Sandra Fisher, and [Leon] Kossoff.” The harsh execution and high-keyed colors belie an elegaic quality, and more than a hint of affection, in these brisk characterizations of some of the most important people in his life, partly visualized from, partly obscured by, the distant vantage point of Southern California.

Gallery label for installation of YCBA collection, 2008

Jean Clair, L'ecole de Londres Aujourd'hui, Connaissance des Arts, Vol. 556, December 1998, pp. 78-83, J10 C761 (SML)

Clear, Cool Look at a Diverse Landscape: Great International Names, Untried Artists, Prince Charles, Scientists Challening Take on Themes, Financial Times, June 9, 2004, p. 16, Available online Available online in FACTIVA

David Cohen, In Search of Kitaj, Art Criticism, Vol. 12, No. 2, 1997, N7475 A79 (A & A)

Miguel Angel Corzo, Mortality immortality?, the legacy of 20th-century art , Getty Conservation Institute, Los Angeles, 1999, p. 13-17, N6485 M67X 1999 + (HAAS)

Figuring women, the female in modern British art. , Yale Center for British Art, New Haven, 2008, pp. 19-22, V 1925 (YCBA)

Sander L. Gilman, R. B. Kitaj's "Good Bad" Diasporism: The Body in Jewish Art, New Art Examiner, Vol. 24, April 1997, pp. 12-21, N1 N49 (A & A)

David Lee, In Profile : R. B. Kitaj, Arts Review, Vol. 46, June 1994, pp. 6-11, N1 A792 OVERSIZE (HAAS)

Maureen Mullarkey, Do-It-Yourself Mythmaking, The New York Sun, March 17, 2005, Available online in Factiva Data Base

Paul Mellon's Legacy, a passion for British art. [large print labels] , Yale Center for British Art, New Haven, CT, 2007, v. 1., N5220 M552 +P381 2007, Mellon Shelf (YCBA)

Michael Peppiatt, Could there be a School of London?, Art International, Vol. 1, Paris, France, Autumn 1987, pp. 6-20, N1 A1 A7 + (A & A)

Ingrid Periz, R. B. Kitaj: Marlborough, ART News, Vol. 100, No. 1, January 2001, pp. 151-52, N1 A6 + (A & A)

Second Diasporist Manifesto, Art in America, Vol. 33, No. 10, October 2000, p. 13, N1 A43 + (A & A)


If you have information about this object that may be of assistance please contact us.