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Creator:
George Stubbs, 1724–1806, British
Title:

Zebra

Former Title(s):

The First Zebra Seen in England

Portrait of a Zebra, standing, turned to the left, in a park

Date:
1763
Medium:
Oil on canvas
Dimensions:
Support (PTG): 40 1/2 × 50 1/4 inches (102.9 × 127.6 cm)
Credit Line:
Yale Center for British Art, Paul Mellon Collection
Copyright Status:
Public Domain
Accession Number:
B1981.25.617
Classification:
Paintings
Collection:
Paintings and Sculpture
Subject Terms:
animal | animal art | dark | forest | gifts | landscape | zebra (mammal) | Zebras
Associated Places:
Africa
Access:
On view in the galleries
Link:
https://collections.britishart.yale.edu/catalog/tms:5009
Export:
XML
IIIF Manifest:
JSON

The zebra in this painting was owned by Queen Charlotte and was the sole survivor of a pair brought back from Southern Africa in 1762 by Sir Thomas Adams, the commanding officer of HMS Terpsichore. Though it wasn’t the first zebra on British shores—Prince Frederick had kept zebras at Kew in the 1740s—it was certainly the most visible. Charlotte’s zebra lived in a paddock near Buckingham House, where it was made available to a public with a thirst for exotic animals, spawning several, sometimes bawdy, tributes to “the Queen’s she-ass.” Beyond satire and public curiosity, the zebra was the subject of great scientific interest, as evidenced by Stubbs’s meticulously painted portrait, which may have been made with the assistance of the anatomists William and John Hunter. Stubbs’s incongruous setting (more forest glade than tended paddock) creates an air of melancholy, suggesting both the wonder and the costs of the Enlightenment.

Gallery label for installation of YCBA collection, 2016



This was the first zebra to be seen in Britain and was sent from the Cape of Good Hope (South Africa) aboard hms Terpsichore as a present for the young Queen Charlotte. It is not known why Stubbs painted her—the picture was still in the artist’s studio when he died in 1806—but he may have gained access to the queen’s menagerie at Buckingham House through the influence and interest in exotic animals of his friend Dr. William Hunter, who was accoucheur to the queen. By this date the zebra or African “she-ass” was a London celebrity and not only attracted widespread interest, but inspired the following rude song, which survives in a printed broadsheet:

Ye Bucks and ye Jemmies who amble the Park,

Whose Hearts and whose Heads are as lightsome

as Cork,

Through Buckingham Gate, as to Chelsea you pass,

Without Fee or Reward, you may see the Q
's A--.

See the Q
's A--. See the Q
's A--,

Without Fee or Reward, &c.

A Sight such as this surely never was seen.

Who the Deuce would not gaze at the A— of a Q——n?

What Prospect so charming — What Scene can surpass

The delicate Sight of her M——’s A—?

Her M——’s A—. Her M——’s A—,

The delicate Sight, &c.

Gallery label for An American's Passion for British Art - Paul Mellon's Legacy (Yale Center for British Art, 2007-04-18 - 2007-07-29)
This is one of the earliest in a long series of paintings of exotic animals, many of which Stubbs produced for his friends William and John Hunter, the Scottish anatomists and men of science. Stubbs may have met John Hunter in connection with the procurement of cadavers that the older, more socially established, and more medically experienced William dissected for his pupils and other interested people in the basement of his London town house. We do not know why Stubbs painted Queen Charlotte's zebra, or African "she-ass," nor why the painting was still in his studio at his death, but it has long been presumed that access to the animal was arranged by William Hunter, who served regularly as accoucheur to the queen.

This was in fact the first zebra to be seen in England. It was brought from South Africa in 1762 by Sir Thomas Adams, the commanding officer of H.M.S. Terpsichore, as a gift from the governor for young Queen Charlotte. Two live specimens were dispatched from the Cape of Good Hope in what Malcolm Warner has described as "Noah's-ark fashion," but only the female survived the voyage. As soon as she reached London, the zebra was installed in the menagerie at Buckingham House (Buckingham Palace) and became an instant celebrity. "The Queen's she-ass," wrote one observer, "was pestered with visits, and had all her hours employed from morning to night in satisfying the curiosity of the public. She had a sentinel and guard placed at the door of her stable. . . . The crowds that resorted to the Asinine palace were exceeding great," (MacClintock, 1992, p. 4). In fact, she also inspired a number of rude songs.-. including this one that circulated in broadsheets:

Ye Bucks and ye Jemmies who amble the Park,

Whose Hearts and whose Heads are as lightsome

as Cork,

Through Buckingham Gate, as to Chelsea you pass,

Without Fee or Reward, you may see the Q
's A--.

See the Q
's A--. See the Q
's A--,

Without Fee or Reward, &c.

(THE QUEEN'S ASS. A NEW HUMOUROUS ALLEGORICAL

SONG. . . By H. Howard, To the Tune of Stick a

Pin There. Broadsheet, British Museum)

Stubbs's grasp of the anatomical differences between zebras and horses is, of course, masterly, and in the present work the backward direction of the ears, the dewlap on the underside of the neck or the front, and the "gridiron" pattern of the stripes on the nether regions, immediately above the tail.-.all these are exactly consistent with zoological verisimilitude and, in fact, identify the present animal as the smallest of three subspecies of zebra, the Cape Mountain. "The Queen's Ass" survived until 3 April 1773, perhaps in spite of sharing its accommodation in due course with an elephant and being moved to the Tower of London.

Angus Trumble

John Baskett, Paul Mellon's legacy: a passion for British art : masterpieces from the Yale Center for British Art, , Yale Center for British Art, New Haven, CT, 2007, pp. 1, 6, 252, no. 23, fig, 1, pl. 23, N5220 M552 P38 2007 OVERSIZE (YCBA)



The Zebra is possibly the first, and arguably the most beautiful, of the documentary studies of exotic species that Stubbs painted alongside his better known sporting pictures and fantastic scenes of horses attacked by lions. Typically, he brought to the subject the detailed anatomical knowledge he had gained through his dissections of horses, as well as habits of painstaking inquiry, observation, and drawing from nature. The result is an image of objectivity and precision, recording special characteristics of the animal such as the particular backward lean of the ears, the dewlap on the underside of the neck, and the "gridiron" pattern of stripes on the back immediately above the tail. By comparison, the efforts of contemporary engravers to represent it appear absurdly crude and conventional, showing merely a horse or donkey with stripes added.

This was the first zebra to be seen in Britain. From Stubbs's painting it can be identified as a Cape Mountain Zebra, the smallest of the three distinct zebra types. It was brought from the Cape of Good Hope (South Africa) by Sir Thomas Adams, captain of hms Terpsichore, for presentation to Queen Charlotte, who was a keen collector of unusual animals. In Noah's-ark fashion, Adams took on board a male and a female, but only this, the female, survived the voyage, arriving in Britain in the summer of 1762. The "painted African ass" (as it was sometimes called) was installed at Buckingham House, the royal residence recently bought by the queen and her husband George III, and became the object of much public interest. "This animal," the London Magazine of July 31, 1762, reported, "from her majesty's good natured indulgence, has been seen by numbers of people, and is now feeding in a paddock near her majesty's house." As a biographer of the Queen later noted:

The Queen's she-ass…was pestered with visits, and had

all her hours employed from morning to night in satisfy

ing the curiosity of the public. She had a centinel and

guard placed at the door of her stable…The crowds that

resorted to the Asinine palace were exceeding great.[1]

The zebra was the talk of the town, even the subject of a bawdy song entitled "The Queen's Ass." Later it was joined at Buckingham House by an elephant and eventually moved to the menagerie at the Tower of London. It died on April 3, 1773, after which its skin was preserved, stuffed, and displayed with other animal curiosities in a touring exhibition.

By portraying the royal zebra against an obviously British rather than African landscape, presumably representing the park at Buckingham House, Stubbs underlines the idea of the scene as directly observed rather than imagined. Here is the animal just as it appeared to him and the rest of its British audience-incongruous almost to a comic degree, with its stripes acting as the opposite of camouflage. Surprisingly, he seems to have painted the work without a commission, whether from Queen Charlotte, George III, or any other interested party, and it remained in his possession throughout his life, appearing in his studio sale in 1807. Perhaps he always intended to keep the work with him, to serve as a kind of advertisement, recognizing such an entirely foreign, "virgin" subject as the ideal showpiece for his abilities as a naturalist-painter.

Malcolm Warner

[1] MacClintock, 4.

Julia Marciari-Alexander, This other Eden, paintings from the Yale Center for British Art , Yale Center for British Art, New Haven, CT, 1998, pp. 4, 114-5, no. 42, ND1314.3 Y36 1998 (YCBA)

William Hunter and the Anatomy of the Modern Museum (Yale Center for British Art, 2019-02-14 - 2019-05-20)

William Hunter and the Anatomy of the Modern Museum (Hunterian Museum and Art Gallery, 2018-09-27 - 2019-01-06)

Enlightened Princesses - Caroline, Augusta, Charlotte, and the Shaping of the Modern World (Historic Royal Palaces, 2017-06-22 - 2017-11-12)

Enlightened Princesses - Caroline, Augusta, Charlotte, and the Shaping of the Modern World (Yale Center for British Art, 2017-02-02 - 2017-04-30)

Yale University Art Gallery 2015 - 2016 (Yale University Art Gallery, 2015-07-27 - 2015-01-05)

The Critique of Reason : Romantic Art, 1760–1860 (Yale University Art Gallery, 2015-03-06 - 2015-07-26)

George Stubbs (Neue Pinakothek - Bayerische Staatsgemäldesammlungen, 2012-01-26 - 2012-05-06)

An American's Passion for British Art - Paul Mellon's Legacy (Royal Academy of Arts, 2007-10-20 - 2008-01-27)

An American's Passion for British Art - Paul Mellon's Legacy (Yale Center for British Art, 2007-04-18 - 2007-07-29)

Great British Paintings from American Collections: Holbein to Hockney (The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens, 2002-02-01 - 2002-05-05)

Great British Paintings from American Collections: Holbein to Hockney (Yale Center for British Art, 2001-09-27 - 2001-12-30)

George Stubbs in the Collection of Paul Mellon: a Memorial Exhibition (Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, 2000-02-14 - 2000-05-15)

George Stubbs in the Collection of Paul Mellon: a Memorial Exhibition (Yale Center for British Art, 1999-04-30 - 1999-09-05)

This Other Eden : British Paintings from the Paul Mellon Collection at Yale (Art Gallery of South Australia, 1998-09-16 - 1998-11-15)

This Other Eden : British Paintings from the Paul Mellon Collection at Yale (Queensland Art Gallery, 1998-07-15 - 1998-09-06)

This Other Eden : British Paintings from the Paul Mellon Collection at Yale (Art Gallery of New South Wales, 1998-05-01 - 1998-07-05)

Stubbs - An Exhibition in Honor of Paul Mellon (National Gallery of Art, 1985-04-11 - 1985-05-04)

George Stubbs (1724-1806) Tate Gallery (Yale Center for British Art, 1985-02-13 - 1985-04-07)

George Stubbs (1724-1806) Tate Gallery (Tate Britain, 1984-10-17 - 1985-01-06)

Noble Exercise - The Sporting Ideal in Eighteenth-Century British Art (Yale Center for British Art, 1982-07-14 - 1982-09-19)

Painting in England 1700-1850 - From The Collection of Mr. and Mrs. Paul Mellon (Yale University Art Gallery, 1965-04-15 - 1965-06-20)

A Zebra, a tigress and a cheetah : new light on Geirge Stubbs's exotic animal subjects, British Art Journal, Vol. 15, Autumn 2014, pp. 99-100, 101, 107, pl. 1, N6761 B74 OVERSIZE (YCBA)

A Great Collection of British Pictures in Virginia, The Times (London), Issue No. 55689, May 1, 1963, p. 22, Available Online : Times Digital Archive Also available on Microfilm: Film An T482 (SML)

Geoffrey Agnew, Yale's 1700 Mellon Pictures, The Times (London), issue no. 59989, Thursday, April 28, 1977, p. 9, Available Online : Times Digital Archive Also available on Microfilm : Film An T842 (SML)

John Baskett, Painting in England: 1700-1850: the Collection of English paintings formed by Mr and Mrs Paul Mellon : on Exhibition at the Museum of Fine Arts, Richmond, until August 18th, , Connoisseur, Vol. 153, London, June 1963, pp. 102, 105, N1 C75 + (YCBA)

John Baskett, Paul Mellon's Legacy: a Passion for British Art: Masterpieces from the Yale Center for British Art, , Yale Center for British Art, New Haven, CT, 2007, pp. 1, 6, 252, no. 23, fig, 1, pl. 23, N5220 M552 P38 2007 OVERSIZE (YCBA)

John Baskett, Paul Mellon's legacy : a passion for British art : masterpieces from the Yale Center for British Art, Yale Center for British Art, New Haven, CT, p. 252, N5220.M552 P38 2007+ (YCBA)

Robin Blake, George Stubbs and the wide creation, animals, people and places in the life of George Stubbs, 1724-1806 , Chatto & Windus, London : Chatto & Windus, 2005, 2005, pp. 215, 278, cl. pl. 11, NJ18.St915 B53 2005 (YCBA)

Christie's sale catalogue : Catalogue of the Valuable Collection of Pictures & Drawings and Engravings of the Early English School of Sir Walter Gilbey : 12 March, 14 March and 15 March 1910, Christie's, Christie, Manson & Woods, London, March 12, 14 and 15, 1910, p. 26, Lot 147, Fiche B51, Fiche# 1408 (YCBA)

Christie's sale catalogue: Catalogue of a Valuable Collection of Sporting Pictures, Drawings, Engravings and Early English Mezzotints, the property of Walter Gibney : 25 May 1891, Christie's, Christie, Manson & Woods, London, May 25, 1891, p. 22, Lot 348, Fiche B51, Fiche # 0574 (YCBA) Also Avaialble online : Art Sales Cataalogues - Lugt # 50014

Christie's sale catalogue: Catalogue of Early English portraits and Ancient and Modern Pictures and Drawings : 15 June 1923, Christie's, Christie, Manson & Woods, London, June 15, 1923, p. 14, Lot 58, Fiche B51, Fiche# 2127 (YCBA)

Malcolm Cormack, A Concise Catalogue of Paintings in the Yale Center for British Art, Yale Center for British Art, New Haven, CT, 1985, pp. 216-217, N590.2 A83 (YCBA)

Malcolm Cormack, Country pursuits, British, American, and French sporting art from the Mellon collections in the Virginia Museum Of Fine Arts , Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Richmond, Charlottesville, 2007, p. 11, ND1383 G7 V57 2007 + OVERSIZE (YCBA)

Malcolm Cormack, George Stubbs in the collection of Paul Mellon, a memorial exhibition , Yale Center for British Art, New Haven, Conn., 1999, p. 39, no. 19, NJ18 St915 G54 1999 (YCBA) Copy 2 is on Mellopn Shelf

Stephen Deuchar, Noble exercise, the sporting ideal in eighteenth-century British art , Yale Center for British Art, New Haven, 1982, pp. 31,34,47, no. 77, ND1388 G7 D48+ (YCBA)

Martina Droth, Britain in the world: Highlights from the Yale Center for British Art in honor of Amy Meyers, Yale University Press, New Haven, London, p. 56, N6761 .Y33 2019 (LC) (YCBA)

Lindsay Duguid, The Recollected Works, TLS, the Times Literary Supplement, Issue no. 5458, November 8, 2007, p. 17, Available Online : TLS Archive Also Available on microfilm : Film S748 (SML)

Judy Egerton, British Sporting and Animal Paintings 1655-1867: A Catalogue, The Paul Mellon Collection , Tate Publishing, London, 1978, pp. 74-75, no. 74, Colour Pl.11, ND1383 G7 B75 OVERSIZE (YCBA)

Judy Egerton, George Stubbs, 1724-1806, [exhibition] Tate Gallery. , Tate Publishing, London, 1984, p. 112, no. 77, NJ18 St915 E43 (YCBA) +

Judy Egerton, George Stubbs, painter, catalogue raisonne , Yale University Press, New Haven, Conn., London, 2007, pp. 50-1, 180-1, no. 40, fig. 4, NJ18 St915 A12 E44 2007 + (YCBA)

Nathan Flis, William Hunter and the Anatomy of the Modern Museum, Yale University Press, New Haven, CT, p. 362, fig. 198, AM343 .W545 2018 (LC) Oversize (YCBA)

Walter Gilbey, Life of George Stubbs, R.A., Vinton, London, 1898, p. 167, NJ18 St915 G55 (HAAS)

Michael Glover, Scenes from Afar, The Times (London), Saturday, September 22, 2007, p. 28, Available Online : Times Digital Arcive Also available on Microfilm: Film An T482 (SML)

Catherine M. Gordon, British paintings Hogarth to Turner, Frederick Warne, London, 1981, p. 62, ND466 G67 (YCBA)

Andrew Graham-Dixon, A history of British art, BBC, London, UK, 1996, pp. 121-2, pl. 45, N6761 G72 1996 (YCBA)

Gill Gregory, The Studio, A Psychoanalytic Legacy, Free Publishing Limited, London, p. 47-60, PR6107.R44475 S78 2015 (LC) (YCBA)

Alec Guinness, My name escapes me, the diary of a retiring actor , Hamish Hamilton, London, 1996, p. 171, PN2598 G8 A34 1996 (Bass)

Regina Karl, Screens, genealogies of the excessive screen, a Mellon Sawyer seminar at Yale, Yale Center for British Art, New Haven, p. 10, V 2776 (YCBA)

Mark Laird, A natural history of English gardening, 1650-1800, The Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art, New Haven, 2015, pp. 248, 250, pl. 222, SB457.6 .L35 2015 OVERSIZE (YCBA)

Dorcas Macclintock, Animals observed, a look at animals in art , Scribner, New York Toronto New York, 1993, p. 33, N7660 M25 1993 (YCBA)

Dorcas Macclintock, Queen Charlotte's zebra, 1992, p.5, front cover, V 0143 (YCBA)

Julia Marciari-Alexander, This other Eden, paintings from the Yale Center for British Art , Yale Center for British Art, New Haven, CT, 1998, pp. 4, 114-5, no. 42, ND1314.3 Y36 1998 (YCBA)

Joanna Marschner, Enlightened Princesses : Caroline, Augusta, Charlotte, and the Shaping of the Modern World, Yale University Press, New Haven, Conn, 2017, p. 481, 512, fig. 29.11, 29.50, NX543 +.E55 2017 Oversize (YCBA)

Melinda Ruth McCurdy, An 18th-Century Star in Stripes, http://huntingtonblogs.org/2018/01/an-18th-century-star-in-stripes/ , Verso Huntington Blogs, January 31, 2018, Available Online

John McDonald, A Feast of Mellon, Sydney Morning Herald, May 9, 1998, p. 14, Film An Sy25 (SML) Also Available Online (Factiva database)

Paul Mellon, Reflections in a silver spoon, a memoir , W. Morrow, New York, 1992, pp. 281, 291, N5220 M552 1992 (YCBA)

Oliver Millar, The later Georgian pictures in the Collection of Her Majesty the Queen., Phaidon, London, 1969, p. xvii (v. 1), ND466 M55 (YCBA) +

Venetia Morrison, The art of George Stubbs, Wellfleet Press, Seacaucus, N.J., 1989, pp. 138-9, NJ18 St915 M67 1989+ (YCBA)

J. B. Myers, Other, Artforum International, Vol. 21, March 1983, p. 44-49, N1 A814 OVERSIZE (HAAS)

National Gallery of Art, Painting in Georgian England from the collection of Mr. and Mrs. Paul Mellon., National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., 1970, p. 6, no. 16, ND488 P25 (YCBA)

Robert Michael Neuman, Baroque and Rococo art and architecture, Pearson, Boston, 2013, p. 401, N6415.B3 N48 2013 (YCBA)

Painting in England 1700-1850 from the Collection of Mr. and Mrs. Paul Mellon, The Royal Academy of Arts Winter Exhibition 1964-65., , Royal Academy of Arts, London, UK, 1964, p. 75 (v. 1), no. 267, pl. 53, ND466 R68 1964/65 (YCBA) Also available on Microfiche: Fiche B214 (YCBA)

Painting in England 1700-1850, collection of Mr. & Mrs. Paul Mellon. , Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Richmond, VA, 1963, p. 166 (v. 1), no. 315, pl. 164, ND466 V57 v.1-2 (YCBA)

Constance-Anne Parker, Mr. Stubbs, the Horse Painter, J. A. Allen, London, 1971, p. 88, NJ18 St915 +P37 Oversize (YCBA)

Paul Mellon's legacy, a passion for British art : April 18-July 29, 2007 , Yale Center for British Art, New Haven, Conn., 2007, back cover, V 1735 (YCBA)

Paul Mellon's Legacy, a passion for British art. [large print labels] , Yale Center for British Art, New Haven, CT, 2007, v.1, no. 23, N5220 M552 +P381 2007, Mellon Shelf (YCBA)

Thomas Pennant, History of quadrupeds [electronic resource]..., v. 1, B. White, London, p. 14, QL737.U62 P58 2018 (YCBA)

Christopher Plumb, The Georgian menagerie : exotic animals in eighteenth-century London, I.B. Tauris, London, 2015, p. 186, fig. 8, QL73.G72 L667 2015

Christopher Plumb, Zebra, Reaktion Books, London, UK, p. 69. 131-133, QL737.U62 P58 2018 (LC) (YCBA)

Lindsay Rothwell, Paul Mellon's legacy, an American's passion for British art : Sackler Wing of Galleries, 20 October 2007 - 27 January 2008 : an introduction to the exhibition for teachers and students. , Royal Academy of Arts, London, UK, 2007, p. 21, fig. 2, V 2038 (YCBA)

Herbert W Rott, George Stubbs, 1724-1806, science into art , Prestel, Munich ; New York, 2012, pp. 180-81, cat. no. 45, NJ18.St915 A1213 2012 + OVERSIZE (YCBA)

Society of Artists of Great Britain, A catalogue of the pictures, sculptures, models, drawings, prints, &c. exhibited by the Society of Artists of Great Britain, 1763, p. 8, no. 121, N5055 S6 C3 (RARE BOOKS, YCBA) Also Available online in Eighteeneth Century Colectionc Online

Sotheby's sale catalogue : Catalogue of Valuable Pictures by Old Masters of the Italian and Dutch Schools : 16 May 1928, Sotheby's, London, May 16, 1928, p. 33, Lot 130, Film B12, Reel 90 of 155 (YCBA)

Stubbs, an exhibition in honor of Paul Mellon : National Gallery of Art, 4 May-2 June 1985. , National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., 1985, no. 27, V 0413 (YCBA)

Basil Taylor, Stubbs, Phaidon, London, 1975, p. 209, pl. 56, NJ18 St915 T39 1975 (YCBA) +

Basil Taylor, Stubbs, Phaidon, London, 1971, p. 209, pl. 56, NJ18 St915 T39 (YCBA) +

The afterlives of animals : a museum menagerie, University of Virginia Press, Charlottesville, VA, pp. 17-36, QL793 .A38X 2011 (SML)

Thorvaldsens Museum, Aftenlandet, motiver og stemninger i dansk landskabsmaleri omkring êar 1800. , Thorvaldsens Museum, Copenhagen, 2011, pp. 173-75, ND1361.5 A47 2011 (YCBA)

William Vaughan, British painting, the Golden Age from Hogarth to Turner , Thames and Hudson, London, 1999, p. 169, no. 115, ND466 V28 1999 (YCBA)

Malcolm Warner, George Stubbs, his patrons and collectors , Magazine Antiques, vol. 166, no. 6, December 2004, p. 70, pl. XII, V 1629 (YCBA) Available Online (Orbis).

Malcolm Warner, Great British paintings from American collections, Holbein to Hockney , Yale Center for British Art, New Haven, CT, 2001, pp. 103-5, no. 33, ND464 W27 2001 (YCBA)

Marina Warner, The Analyst: Whether Painting Men or Horses, George Stubbs Knew What Made Them Tick, Connoisseur, v. 215,, March 1985, p. 134, N1 C75 + (YCBA)

Giles Waterfield, Mr. Mellon, RA : the magazine for the Friends of the Royal Academy, No. 96, Autumn 2007, p. 71, V 1905 (YCBA)

Lawrence Trevelyan Weaver, Painter of pedigree, Thomas Weaver of Shrewsbury, Animal Artist of the Agricultural Revolution, London, p. 303, NJ18.W3733 W43 2017 (LC) (YCBA)

Yale University Art Gallery, Painting in England, 1700-1850, from the collection of Mr. and Mrs. Paul Mellon, [exhibition at] Yale University Art Gallery, April 15-June 20, 1965. , vol. 1, W. Clowes and sons, New Haven, 1965, pp. 47-8 (v.1), no. 179, pl. 53, ND466 Y35 (YCBA)


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